Through an industrially formed complex, we have become out of touch, or rather, our touch is losing its sense of meaning. Our touch has been stripped of context, depth, and clarity. The goal of this work is to reveal material and process through the objects. By enhancing our sense of material context, we deepen our interaction with immediate objects. Clay, wood, fiber, pixels, words, bodies, thoughts – all share resonance, a deep and careful hum, an infinitely crossing pollination of properties and processes.

 

So what does it mean to see a thread between your supposed material being and the fast-moving emptiness?

 

Your breath is an antique relic, so breathe in deep  --- you & me & that rock over there --- it’s all one and the same.  

This distance you have imagined is a great conspiracy!

Connecting to that chair means connecting to everything -

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By nature the work is a collaboration with the material - I am directed by the wood as much as it directs me. The indexical trace of the hand is an age-old story - nature is anything you touch, and everything you don’t touch, and touch is indeed a transformative moment.


 

I am building a house but it is empty

It is waiting for you

Waiting for you to come and fill it with your words and silence

your memories, your love,  your inescapable loneliness

Sometimes I live there

Sewing seeds in the garden

Pulling green out of the rotting deadwood

Extending my roots into the drought-ridden soil

Hoping for growth

Hoping to reach you

Olwyn maintains a dynamic art practice, including writing, gardening, weaving, furniture, woodworking, ceramics, drawing, painting, video, and soft sculpture

Raised in Denver, Colorado, they pursued their Bachelor of Fine Art in Fiber at Maryland Institute College of Art. They concentrated in Sustainability and Social Practice and studied Ecology for a summer abroad at Burren College of Art in Ireland. They now continue to pursue their love for making based out of Asheville, North Carolina. 

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